NASA‘s Curiosity rover recorded an amazing image from its newest perch on the side of Mars‘ Mount Sharp. The objective group was so motivated by the appeal of the landscape, they integrated 2 variations of the black-and-white images from various times of the day and included colors to develop an uncommon postcard from the Red Planet.

Curiosity catches a 360- degree view of its environments with its black-and-white navigation electronic cameras each time it finishes a drive. To make the resulting panorama simpler to send out to Earth, the rover keeps it in a compressed, low-grade format. When the rover group saw the view from Curiosity’s most current stopping point, the scene was simply too quite not to record it in the greatest quality that the navigation electronic cameras are capable of.

NASA’s Curiosity Rover Black and White Navigation Camera Afternoon

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover utilized its black-and-white navigation electronic cameras to record panoramas of this scene at 2 times of day. This was the view at 4: 10 p.m. regional Mars time. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Many of the rover’s most sensational panoramas are from the color Mastcam instrument, which has far greater resolution than the navigation cams. That’s why the group included colors of their own to this most current image. The blue, orange, and green tints are not what the human eye would see; rather, they represent the scene as seen at various times of day.

On November 16, 2021 (the 3,299 th Martian day, or sol, of the objective), engineers commanded Curiosity to take 2 sets of mosaics, or composite images, catching the scene at 8: 30 a.m. and once again at 4: 10 p.m. regional Mars time. The 2 times of day offered contrasting lighting conditions that highlighted a range of landscape information. The group then integrated the 2 scenes in a creative re-creation that consists of components from the early morning scene in blue, the afternoon scene in orange, and a mix of both in green.

NASA’s Curiosity Rover Black and White Navigation Camera Morning

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover utilized its black-and-white navigation video cameras to record panoramas of this scene at 2 times of day. This was the view at 8: 30 a.m. regional Mars time. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

At the center of the image is the view pull back Mount Sharp, the 3-mile-tall (5-kilometer-tall) mountain that Curiosity has actually been increasing considering that2014 Rounded hills can be seen in the range at center-right; Curiosity got a better view of these back in July, when the rover began to see interesting modifications in the landscape. A field of sand ripples referred to as the “Sands of Forvie” extends a quarter- to a half-mile (400 to 800 meters) away.

At the far right of the panorama is the craggy “Rafael Navarro Mountain,” called after a Curiosity group researcher who died previously this year. Poking up behind it is the upper part of Mount Sharp, far above the location Curiosity is checking out. Mount Sharp lies inside Gale Crater, a 96- mile-wide (154- kilometer-wide) basin formed by an ancient effect; Gale Crater’s far-off rim stands 7,500 feet high (2.3 kilometers), and shows up on the horizon about 18 to 25 miles away (30 to 40 kilometers).

The Curiosity objective is led by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is handled by Caltech in Pasadena, California.

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